AccuCirc tells me to take a hike

Marilyn Milos graciously asked me to assist with the NOCIRC booth at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual conference. Today was the first day. Upon arrival, we immediately became aware of the AccuCirc booth. I had previously briefly seen a brochure entitled “AccuCirc Physician Training Manual.” I decided I would approach the booth and talk to the individuals there.

Standing in front of two men behind the AccuCirc table, I picked up the “Physician Training Manual” from their rack and began to thumb through it. The severe looking gentleman with the weathered features and sky blue eyes asked me some question I didn’t quite make out as I was aghast at the photos of torture contained therein.

I asked him where the device was made. He said, ‘In the good ol’ red, white and blue USA.” Or something similarly strange. He then asked me who I was with. Wearing an exhibitor’s badge with the name NOCIRC on it, I didn’t feel I could or needed to hide the fact. I asked him where in the US the product was made. He said words to the effect, “Why? Are you going to picket us?” I responded, “No, I’m not personally. I live here.” I then asked him if I could take the “Physician Training Manual” that I was holding. He paused for a few seconds and then abruptly snatched it out of my hands. He then said he would prefer that I go back to my own booth and leave them alone.

Below is a page from their “Physician Training Manual.” Looks like torture to me. Notice the disrespectful way the plastic twisting device grips the prepuce in a knot before step three hides the mass to be chopped out of view within the plastic tube.

Can’t get enough? Click on the image above for a better look or check out the complete “Manual” for examples of complications common to the “other guys’ products.” 

About David Wilton

fronterizo, public defender
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8 Responses to AccuCirc tells me to take a hike

  1. Joe says:

    It’s a shame that you probably didn’t have a copy of the article about the 10 million dollar lawsuit just settled, to give them a preview of things to come.

  2. David Wilton says:

    It didn’t appear they were in the mood to accept anything from me but a steadily diminishing view of my back.
    I found the defensiveness interesting. They didn’t defend their device. They just wanted me gone. Telling.

  3. What stands out for me is “Atraumatic” – really?!? I would laugh if it weren’t so disgusting and sad…
    Thanks for representing at the conference~

  4. Devin says:

    It accurately shows the great amount of tissue that is amputated from the penis during a circ. Remember the prepuce is a “double layer” with an inner mucosal layer and the outer layer shown. The photos verify a majority of the penile shaft tissue being amputated on the infant’s penis. I can’t believe this violation of human rights is still being performed in the U.S.A. in 2010! Thanks for All your Efforts David!

  5. Joseph Lewis says:

    You can thank our FDA for approving this shit…

  6. Hugh7 says:

    “Atraumatic”? Tell that to the baby having his foreskin torn away from his glans in photo 2.
    I find several problems with it:
    1. It is a blind procedure with no guarantee that the glans will stay out of harm’s way.
    2. If it fails to cut completely, the operator has no way of seeing that, and is likely to pull the instrument off, and perhaps a random amount of the rest of the penis with it.
    3. If the operator does see that in time, there appears to be no way to dismantle the instrument simply and safely. It’s like BP in the Gulf of Mexico … but instead of oil spurting out – blood.
    (If it can be dismantled, it is likely to be reused in poor countries, with consequent risk of cross-infection.)
    4. What happens to the frenulum is very much a matter of chance, depending on what the blunt probe did, and where the frenulum ends up, between the inner ring and the outer.
    The Accu-circ has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the US, on babies up to ten days old, on the basis that it is “substantially equivalent … to legally marketed … devices” but in fact it is radically different.
    * It is the only one that conceals the penis
    * The only one that puts a chopping block inside the foreskin
    * The only one that grasps the chopping block through the foreskin
    * The only one that cuts in a circle
    * The only one that chops instead of slicing.
    The inventor, Tomlinson, has treated circumcision as if it were a kitchen chore like crushing garlic, and invented a device to do it like that. But garlic doesn’t die, and it doesn’t sue.

  7. Hugh7 is right. The Accucirc does not do justice to just how the natural penis looks and works. The corona is not a ring around the penis, as the Accucirc’s inventor seems to assume, but is heart shaped. Hence any device that cuts in a circle invites trouble. Also, the Accucirc manual is silent about the frenulum and its fate, intended or otherwise. In my opinion, all circumcision related hardware suffers from these or related failings.

  8. Joseph Lewis says:

    “If people are acting in good faith, then answering questions should be a simple and professional process.”
    I found this on a blog about a different mutilation device (the TaraKlamp).
    http://www.thoughtleader.co.za/amabhungane/2010/10/04/the-blunt-truth-about-new-circumcision-device/

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